Carleton University’s Prof. Ahmed Abdulla will host Ingenious Talks Online: Engineering Energy Systems for a Climate in Crisis. Presented by Carleton’s Faculty of Engineering and Design, Ingenious Talks is a special speaker series that engages the community in discussions of timely and innovative ideas in engineering, design and technology.

When: Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021 from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m.

Registration: https://carleton.ca/engineering-design/cu-events/engineering-energy-systems-for-a-climate-in-crisis/.

About the Talk

Climate change alarm bells are ringing for researchers as mounting evidence reveals the extent of humanity’s impact on the Earth and the growing risks of inaction on carbon pollution. Emissions are rising at one-to-two per cent per year, which sets the world further back from stabilizing the climate at internationally agreed upon temperature targets, such as the Paris Agreement’s 1.5ºC goal.

An aggressive, clear-eyed response is required to address climate change—first and foremost by decarbonizing the global energy system. This response should be similar to pandemic and wartime mobilizations in both scale and urgency.

In this talk, Abdulla will discuss energy system design in this radically new context, presenting results from recent research on the role of unproven technologies, such as direct air capture (DAC) of carbon dioxide and carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS). He will conclude by discussing how his research group is developing a new generation of energy system models that integrate real-world challenges to energy deployment.

About the Speaker

Abdulla co-leads the Alternative Pathways for the Energy Transition (APEX) research group at Carleton, which is devoted to accelerating the transition to a deeply decarbonized energy system in Canada and around the world, in order to avert the worst consequences of climate change. His research investigates energy system design for deep decarbonization—employing large-scale optimization, process engineering, and systems engineering to assess the potential contribution of disruptive energy technologies that sit at a low level of technical readiness, such as electric vehicles, power to fuels, and negative emissions technologies.

Media Contact
Steven Reid
Media Relations Officer
Carleton University
613-265-6613
Steven.Reid3@carleton.ca

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Friday, February 12, 2021 in
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