March 8 is International Women’s Day and Carleton experts are available to comment.

Clare Beckton
Executive in Residence, Centre for Research and Education on Women and Work

Phone: 613-795-5026
Email: Clare.Beckton@carleton.ca

Beckton has extensive experience in a broad range of areas, including leading large organizations, strategic planning, governance, leadership to change systems, risk management, gender, diversity, inclusion, Indigenous policy issues and advancement of women’s leadership.

She served as the deputy head of Status of Women Canada, managing the departmental agency and providing advice to ministers. She led the development of public policy for the advancement of women and helped non-profits seek funding to benefit women.

Rebecca Bromwich
Adjunct Professor, Department of Law and Legal Studies

Phone:  613-520-2600, ext. 2621
Email: Rebecca.Bromwich@carleton.ca

Bromwich is the former program director of the Graduate Diploma in Conflict Resolution. Her current role is manager, Diversity and Inclusion, for the law firm Gowling WLG. Bromwich has been a columnist for Lawyers Weekly and has authored and co-authored several books for students and legal system practitioners, including lawyers, paralegals and police.

Amina Mire
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Phone:  613-520-2600, ext. 4476
Email
: Amina.Mire@carleton.ca

Mire’s areas of research interest include women and health; racialization and bio-medicalization of women’s bodies and skin; anti-aging; women, science and technology; political thought; sociology of gender; sociology of knowledge; gender and the cinema; as well as anti-racist and anti-colonial research.

Mire’s current research projects include examining the social, ethical, political and pedagogical implications of anti-aging discourse and practice; investigating the extent to which the female body continues to be a contested site of social investment and regulation; and a project examining changing skin-whitening technologies by tracing their emergence from colonial encounters, in which white skin was accorded social and cultural capital, toward the contemporary global marketing of biotechnology products that promise smooth, brightened and youthful-looking skin to affluent women.

Media Contact

Elizabeth Murphy
Communications Co-ordinator
Carleton University
613-520-2600, ext. 8834
Elizabeth.Murphy@carleton.ca

Follow us on Twitterwww.twitter.com/Cunewsroom
Need an expert? Go towww.carleton.ca/newsroom/experts

Tuesday, March 3, 2020 in
Share: Twitter, Facebook

More News Posts